Statues of Dublin

I love a city that erects statues to its writers.

Even though James Joyce did most of his work abroad he casts a long shadow over Dublin. Two monuments to him are pictured here. My original plan was to visit Dublin during the summer of 2020 to attend some of the European Championship matches. Alas the pandemic suffocated that plan which would also have allowed me to have been here on June 16th, a. k. a. Bloomsday.

Here’s a statue to W. B. Yeats in St. Stephen’s Green. This one is even more abstract than the one I found in Sligo.

Big thanks to frequent commenter Pensive Poet who mentioned this statue of Oscar Wilde which I hadn’t even heard about. I think sculptor Danny Osborne absolutely captured the wit and decadence of Wilde in this work. He used different stones to add color to what are usually monochrome commemorations.

I’ve also visited Wilde’s grave in Paris and his tombstone is just as over-the-top, a twenty ton Egyptian Sphinx.

Another big thanks to frequent commenter, Bernie Bell, who mentioned a statue that the locals call the Floozie in the Jacuzzi. She’s a gorgeous personification of the River Liffey which bisects the city, named Anna Livia, after a character in Joyce’s Finnegans Wake. Check out this link to see her original installation which I think was much more pleasing.

And finally, the infamous Molly Malone statue, a. k. a. The Tart with the Cart, based on a traditional Irish song. I guess the water’s gotten to me because I was inspired to write this little quatrain:

Molly Malone’s tits are shiny
Tourists rub them for good luck
She sold cockles from the briny
Now that’s a statue I’m down to f

About Bartholomew Barker

Bartholomew Barker is one of the organizers of Living Poetry, a collection of poets and poetry lovers in the Triangle region of North Carolina. Born and raised in Ohio, studied in Chicago, he worked in Connecticut for nearly twenty years before moving to Hillsborough where he makes money as a computer programmer to fund his poetry habit.
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18 Responses to Statues of Dublin

  1. Beautiful statues! And beautiful Dublin!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Michele Lee says:

    A wonderful post!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. JeanMarie says:

    Cool beans. Love the Oscar Wilde statue. So did you rub Molly’s tits? As to the rest of the quatrain, I’m sure you can do better than cold bronze to keep you warm.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. berniebell1955 says:

    I suspect you’ve been on the Guinness again – how v. rude.
    I’ve remembered – The Tart With The Cart is also known as the Trollope With The Scallops…and The Floozie In The Jacuzzi is also known as The Hewer In The Sewer – needs to be said with a Dublin accent really.
    I agree – the original was much better …

    Liked by 1 person

  5. berniebell1955 says:

    And…you’re in m’blog again….

    http://www.spanglefish.com/berniesblog/blog.asp?blogid=16048

    Liked by 1 person

  6. berniebell1955 says:

    It’s not a statue of him, but it’s to honour him, in his home town….. https://www.orkney.gov.uk/News?postid=5751

    Orkney’s own George Makay Brown. Here’s his poem about a Poet…

    The Poet

    Therefore he no more troubled the pool of silence.
    But put on mask and cloak,
    Strung a guitar
    And moved among the folk.

    Dancing they cried,
    ‘Ah, how our sober islands
    Are gay again, since this blind lyrical tramp
    Invaded the Fair!’

    Under the last dead lamp
    When all the dancers and masks had gone inside
    His cold stare
    Returned to its true task, interrogation of silence.

    George Mackay Brown

    Well – I am a ” frequent commenter”…..

    Liked by 1 person

  7. berniebell1955 says:

    You’re becoming a regular feature….

    http://www.spanglefish.com/berniesblog/blog.asp?blogid=16049

    It’s good to have folk to have this kind of exchange with – keeps the little grey cells stirring.

    Liked by 1 person

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